Lamb Pastrami

ssorllih
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Jan 10, 2013 01:54

There are several places in the Marianski books that discuss the acceptable levels of salt and nowhere is 7% considered acceptable except for storage and then it is a bit low. 3% is considered the upper limit of palatability.
Ross- tightwad home cook
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Jan 10, 2013 02:08

Redzed wrote:
Perhaps CW can review and comment, and if the measure is indeed an erratum, it can be corrected by the webmaster.
It's only fair for me to let Stan Marianski know about this post and get his response first hand. Let's see what the big guy himself has to say about the salt content. I'll rattle his chain tonight.

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Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Thu Jan 10, 2013 05:20

For anyone who is interested in this, here is a translation of a traditional smoked mutton recipe published in the recipe section of the Polish Wędliny Domowe site.
http://wedlinydomowe.pl/wedzonki/inne-w ... na-wedzona

Smoked Mutton (Baranina Wędzona)

The following cuts are best suited for smoking:
Leg
Loin
Brisket
Shoulder

Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat:
40g roasted salt
2.5g salt peter (substitute 3g cure #1)
.5g allspice
.3g coriander
1/2 garlic clove
Piece of bay leaf

Instructions:
Chill and rub the meat on all sides with the salt and spice mixture and rest for a few hours at room temperature. Tightly pack into a container, cover with a plate, add weight and place in refrigirator. Every few days check the meat and rotate from top to bottom. After approximately 3 weeks, hang and dry the meat for 2-3days in a cool and vented environment. Cold smoke for 6-8 days, or longer if larger pieces of meat are used. The smoked meat is once again hung in a cool and airy place until dry.

Contributed by: T.Cymer
Translated by: Redzed
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Post by markjass » Thu Jan 10, 2013 06:28

Thanks redzone for taking the time to post the Smoked Mutton (Baranina Wędzona) recipe. i do find this forum, the members, the web pages and the book so good. Without it I would have probably spent years messing things up, un-inventing and then re-inventing the wheel and wasting many $$$$$$ and tried many peoples taste-buds an patience. As I develop my knowledge and skills I will be able to offer my thoughts rather than just ask questions.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Jan 10, 2013 16:58

Hi Guys,
I just received this message from Stan Marianski. He is most grateful to Mark for pointing this out. He wrote:
Hi [Chuckwagon],

[Mark] was right. There was too much salt in a dry mix. You can quote me on that. I was wrong. Actually, the whole recipe was confusing. It has been re-written and it will be updated on our website in a day or two and in the book. The new recipe version follows below. It is much simpler. I am also sending it as an attachment. You can reply in my name.

Thanks,
Stanley
Stan's Revised Recipe
(To Be Published)

Beef brisket, 1 kg

Curing solution: 35 SAL (10 Baume), 101 g salt per 1 liter of water

Salt, 90 g (5 Tbsp)
Cure #1, 18 g (1 Tbsp)
Sugar, 10 g (2 tsp)
Water, 1 liter

Spice mixture:

Black pepper, cracked, 10 g (1 Tbsp)
Coriander seeds, whole or cracked, 10 g (1 Tbsp)
Garlic, 3.5 g (1 clove)

1. Mix brine ingredients in warm water, then cool the brine in refrigerator.
2a.Pumping meat. Pump brisket with 10% curing solution (brisket should weigh 110% of its original weight).
Add the remaining brine to cover the meat and cure for 2 days (3-4 days for 2-3 kg meat).
OR
2b.No pumping meat. Cover brisket with brine and cure for 4 days. Use about 4 days per 1 kg of meat.
3. Remove brisket from brine, wash, drain and wipe dry.
4. Coat the brisket with spice mixture. Be generous with your rub, it should be applied in a thick coating.
5. Hang in a preheated to 130° F (54° C) smokehouse (no smoke applied). With dampers fully open,
hold at this temperature for about one hour, until meat surface is dry.
6. Re-adjust dampers to 1/4 open and apply light smoke for 2 hours. Raise temperature to 200 - 220° F (93 - 104° C).
Cook until an internal temperature of 165°F (74° C) is reached.
7. Hang at room temperature for 1-2 hours. Serve or refrigerate.

Pastrami may be dry cured. For 1 kg (2.20 lb.) beef use:

Salt, 36 g, 2 Tbsp.
Cure #1, 5 g (1 tsp). This comes to 312 ppm of sodium nitrite. The USDA allows 625 ppm for dry curing meat. Sodium nitrite
dissipates rapidly, after curing, smoking and cooking not much is left.
Note: there is 4.69 g salt in Cure #1
Spice mixture:

Cracked black pepper, 3 tsp
Coriander seeds, 3 tsp.
Brown sugar, 2 tsp.
Garlic, 1 clove, finely minced

a. Mix salt, cure, and spice mixture together and rub it into the meat. Massage it well and cover the meat`s surface evenly.
b. Place meat in a Ziplock plastic bag.
c. Hold in a refrigerator for 5 days, turning the package daily.
d. Remove meat from the package, rinse with cold water, drain, pat dry with paper towel.
e. Make another spice mixture and coat the brisket with it. Be generous with your rub, it should be applied in a thick coating.
f. Smoking/cooking - follow steps 5,6 and 7.
____________________________

Thanks Stan. We appreciate your quick response.
And Mark, thanks for bringing this to our attention. The correction is very valuable to Stan and will be permanent in future editions.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by markjass » Wed Jan 30, 2013 09:03

Wowwwwwwwwww. The pastrami hit the spot. Thanks for your help. My camera has packed a sad. May be with a bit of TLC it will start working again.
Do no harm. Margerine is the biggest food crime
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Jan 30, 2013 09:21

Mark, I'm glad things worked out for you. Pastrami is everyone's favorite here. Okay pal, get your camera fixed.

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Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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A picture

Post by markjass » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:12

He is a picture of the pastrami

Image
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Post by crustyo44 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 19:55

After seeing this photo, It is now on my "to do"list.
Markjass, your lamb pastrami looks beautiful!!!!!!!!
Luckily we have lamb on special here everywhere and legs are the cheapest. Go figure!!
Congratulations,
Jan.
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Feb 02, 2013 03:42

Yes Sirrrreee! That's some of the best I've ever seen. Nice job Mark.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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