ayrshire bacon

BriCan
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Post by BriCan » Mon Aug 31, 2015 16:39

I have finally got power back and it has taken me sometime to re-establish internet access so have only just seen this

Glad to know that I have not lost my knack on doing things :lol: and that you have enjoyed :smile:
ajwillsnet
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Post by ajwillsnet » Sun Apr 16, 2017 21:03

I had one sausage spice supplier tell me that the key to success on Ayshire bacon is to tumble both the loin and bacon to activate the Myocin which acts as binder when you roll the two together.
BriCan
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Post by BriCan » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:56

ajwillsnet wrote:I had one sausage spice supplier tell me that the key to success on Ayshire bacon is to tumble both the loin and bacon to activate the Myocin which acts as binder when you roll the two together.
Don't believe that sausage supplier as it is not true at all, :) it all comes down to the dry cure and the aging/maturing which takes up to twelve weeks total

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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Fri Apr 21, 2017 21:49

Don't believe that sausage supplier as it is not true at all, :) it all comes down to the dry cure and the aging/maturing which takes up to twelve weeks total
agree with your statement BriCan with aging/maturing method, but - there is another way to prepare that cut - wet curing in brine, hot smoking and poaching. In that way ajwillsnet statement is also correct - personally I'm using small tenderizer.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x48 ... yWzRN2.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x48 ... zno8Z7.jpg
BriCan
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Post by BriCan » Fri Apr 21, 2017 22:16

StefanS wrote: agree with your statement BriCan with aging/maturing method, but - there is another way to prepare that cut - wet curing in brine, hot smoking and poaching. In that way ajwillsnet statement is also correct - personally I'm using small tenderizer.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x48 ... yWzRN2.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x48 ... zno8Z7.jpg
In the context that was quoted for Ayrshire bacon what I have posted is correct, there is only one butcher shop in Scotland that brines there Ayrshire bacon and then drys and rolls before aging

Ayrshire bacon is never pre-cooked before slicing, it is the customer that fry's it up for breakfast

What you have posted back home in the UK we would call that boiled ham, and that is not to take away from what you have done which looks great :)

This mine done in a traditional Gammon brine for 3 days then hung to dry for a further 3 days. Stuffed with cured pork forcemeat before being cooked uncovered at 325 degrees F until internal temperature reaches 145 degrees F

It is what we known as Stuffed pork loin roast :)

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Apr 22, 2017 06:55

Stefan and Brican, you are making me hungry! I think I gained 3lbs just looking at those pictures!
BriCan
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Post by BriCan » Sat Apr 22, 2017 07:27

redzed wrote:Stefan and Brican, you are making me hungry! I think I gained 3lbs just looking at those pictures!
Thanks Chris, it's nice to know that I have not lost my touch :)

On a side note, I will be across on the weekend of the 20th May for the Cheese and Meat Festival and if you would like some more of the Ayrshire bacon give me a shout
farmboy236
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Post by farmboy236 » Sat Apr 22, 2017 16:00

Are yall using meat glue to bind these or just rolling and tying? If you are rolling and tying do you have a problem with it falling apart or coming unrolled when you slice it? you guys are an inspiration!
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Post by BriCan » Sat Apr 22, 2017 20:19

farmboy236 wrote:Are yall using meat glue to bind these or just rolling and tying?
I cannot speak for others, but myself I would/will not use meat glue in any of my products

I have a very close friend who has had a kidney transplant and any trace of meat glue (its beef based) can and will make him violently ill which could kill him

A better deal is to use gelatin powder, and again make sure it is pork base as there is beef gelatin on the market
If you are rolling and tying do you have a problem with it falling apart or coming unrolled when you slice it?
I myself have no problems rolling and tying as I have been doing it as a job for over 55 years but I did (the rolling part) when I first started in the trade

the trick on not having it come apart while slicing is to not have the meat wet when rolling, you need it dry enough so that it feels tacky to the touch, much akin to when you cold smoke.

Next you need to beat the living heck out of it when rolling (prevents air pockets), you can (and i do) sprinkle some gelatin powder on the meat side before rolling

Tying, -- Start in the middle with the first string, second one at either the right or left end, the third at the opposite end -- now start tying from the end (left or right) into the centre making sure of even spacing -- follow the same procedure from the opposite end

And finally you need to age/mature the bacon for at least four weeks, I do mine longer on these

Hope this helps
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Post by farmboy236 » Sun Apr 23, 2017 13:02

Yes .... that ,without a doubt, helps! Thank you.
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