New guy Salami Recipe questions

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muxmun
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New guy Salami Recipe questions

Post by muxmun » Fri Oct 02, 2015 16:45

This will be my first attempt at making a dry cured product. My frost free freezer has been modified and set to go. I am looking at this recipe from Len Poli.

http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/Sal ... lation.pdf

It calls for 1/2 cup of dry milk. Is that just the powder with no water?? I have instant nonfat dry milk. Is this what I use?
He also calls for 2 tsp of garlic. Would that be garlic powder? I think so but I'm the new guy that doesn't know crap.. :smile:

And last he says put the fat through a quarter inch plate but no mention of the size for the meat.

I'm soooo confused!!

Thanks...charlie
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Fri Oct 02, 2015 17:49

Hey Charlie-
That recipe does leave out many details.
As far as adding dry milk to sausages you will need to get the finely ground powder and not the flakes sold in most stores.
To be honest you really don't need fillers like milk powder or soy protein powder in your fermented sausages.

Can we talk you into trying a different recipe for your first attempt?

A good place to start is here http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... inocchiona

Many other time tested recipes available also.

If you already purchased your culture most recipies are adaptable.
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Post by muxmun » Fri Oct 02, 2015 18:18

Bob K. I can be talked into almost anything. I ordered the LHP but I can order the SPX no problem.
The Salami Finocchiona calls for dextrose 0.2%...I dont understand that amount.
As for the red wine, some folks don't use it but if its going to make it better I will put it in. I would plan on making 5lbs. Is that reasonable?

Thanks...charlie
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Post by Bob K » Fri Oct 02, 2015 18:49

OK Charlie
The .2% would be 2 grams per 1000 grams or 2.2lbs of meat.

For different weights just convert lbs to grams and multiply by .002

Conversion scales can be found here: http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... calculator.
Wine can be omitted no problem never use it myself...but I drink Beer!

5lbs is a good place to start.
As far as the amount of culture to use 3-4 grams per 5lbs would be good for your first try

The LPH is a fast culture if you built a chamber I would get the T-SPX.

Maybe Redzed will chime in also
Last edited by Bob K on Sat Oct 03, 2015 01:06, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by muxmun » Fri Oct 02, 2015 19:12

Bob
Thanks for taking the time to educate me. I'll get the SPX and the wine, drink the wine and chase it with a beer. :smile:
I am sure I will have more questions going forward, and again, Thanks for taking the time.

charlie
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Oct 03, 2015 08:29

Hi muxmum and welcome to the forum! I made that recipe a couple of years ago and while it was OK, I really have no intention of making it again. I found this one way too sour and rather pasty and lacking in flavourI have grown to like dry cured sausages with a more mild traditional taste, but with a an easily identifiable flavour panel. If you want to make it, go ahead but give it a coarser grind, 5mm is too fine and it will take too long to dry. Use a 6mm or 7mm plate, freeze the cubed fat to a solid and thoroughly chill the meat so it is near freezing. Grind the meat and fat together. Skip the corn syrup solids or use half the amount of dextrose and half the amount of corns syrup solids. And as Bob indicated, the dry milk powder is not necessary. If you want something with a bit of heat then omit the mace and coriander, and add 2TBS of crushed chili flakes. And as far as the garlic I think he probably meant granulated garlic judging by the amount.

I hope that this did not confuse you any further, so if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.
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Post by muxmun » Sat Oct 03, 2015 14:00

redzed
Thanks for taking the time to help me out. That is good information. I think I will stay away from the sour stuff at least for the time being. Per advice from Bob K, I think I will try the Salami Finocchiona recipe. I have added to my order the spx so we will give it a go. It should all be here by late next week.
I'm glad to have found this forum. Lots of help for beginners like me. Thanks again.

charlie
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Post by muxmun » Tue Dec 13, 2016 03:31

Hello all again. I am going to get this going again..Salami Finocchiona. Its been over a year and right after I posted it all fell apart as I was called too work a long ways away, (and I thought I was retired..sheesh.. :-)
So I intend to make this Salami recipe that is on this site we are on, Wedliny Domowe http://www.meatsandsausag...ami-finocchiona .

I plan on using the B-LC 007 culture instead of the SPX and use according to their specs.

This recipe calls for grinding through a 3/16 plate..Should I grind first through a larger plate and then the 3/16 ??

Bactoferm says add the ingredients before the grind and then mix. Does that sound OK??

I'm OK with the peppercorn whole but the fennel not sure. Crush it first a bit or just add whole ??
Also not sure about adding optional spices and herbs. Not sure as this is my first time.

Sorry to bother and Thanks for your time.

charlie
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Post by Bob K » Tue Dec 13, 2016 13:34

muxmun wrote:This recipe calls for grinding through a 3/16 plate..Should I grind first through a larger plate and then the 3/16 ??
There's really no need and grinding twice increases the chance of fat smearing.
muxmun wrote:Bactoferm says add the ingredients before the grind and then mix. Does that sound OK??
That is fine I do it that way also...gets a headstart on mixing
muxmun wrote:I'm OK with the peppercorn whole but the fennel not sure. Crush it first a bit or just add whole ??
Also not sure about adding optional spices and herbs. Not sure as this is my first time.
I don't like them whole either. You can crack or partially grind.

Probably best sticking to the original recipe and make the additions in future batches if needed to adjust to taste.

Good Luck and keep us posted!
Last edited by Bob K on Tue Dec 13, 2016 14:38, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Tue Dec 13, 2016 13:55

I've had great success with the 007. That's all I use, but the PH does drop pretty fast, so keep an eye on it. Peppercorns and fennel are personal preferences. I come from a little town where 80% of the people are Italian. You can never have an argument with anybody whether fennel goes in fresh Italian sausage or not, or whether you use nutmeg in homemade tortellini. I feel it necessary for flavor to have fennel when making fresh Italian sausage. As long as people don't bite directly into the fennel seed, they like my flavor, so I trick them by grinding it. As for curing meats, I make a traditional soppressata in a beef middle casing, which I do not use fennel and I use whole peppercorns for flavor, although when eating it, most people pop out the peppercorns. But, I also take my Italian sausage recipe, add cure, dextrose and 007 and cure the sausage in a 35-38mm casing. In this situation, I don't use peppercorns. I use ground red pepper flakes and whole fennel and let it dry to close to 50%. The 3/16" blade is fairly coarse. I love it. To some people, they can't get over the "chunkier" fat pieces. Last time I made the cured italian sausage, I did lean out the fat and put it through a finer blade. The initial drying time was a concern, but in time, they did firm up. This is all personal preference. As long as it cures properly, it's whatever you like,,,and you won't know that until you make some. Whatever you do, keep a spreadsheet of your recipes with the doses you used so you have some sort of reference if you want to change anything or replicate it. As much as you think you will remember them, you won't. After making some Braseola, I am a firm believer that I don't think I like coriander. Some people may argue wth me, but it doesn't matter,,,,because there one thing I noticed,,,,,no matter how much you slice, it always seems to get eaten. ENJOY
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Post by alhunter63 » Wed Dec 14, 2016 17:37

Hello guys, I took a sabbatical & haven't been here in a while. I haven't made any dry sausage in a while and was thinking of making some in the next few days. I have always used fresh pork right from the butcher. I red somewhere on this site that only when you deep freeze the pork that you kill the Tricia worm & that even using Cure #2 with the fresh pork doesn't kill it.

Do use guys recommend using fresh or frozen pork for your dry cured fermented sausages?

Thanks,
Angelo
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Post by Bob K » Wed Dec 14, 2016 18:03

Angelo-
The chance of trich. from commercial pork is very low, however the chance still exists so the choice is yours.
Personally I don't hesitate to use it for dry cured products.

If I am using wild pigs or local farm raised I follow the regs which can be found here: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/9/318.10
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Post by alhunter63 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 05:27

Thanks Bob, that was very helpful and that site was loaded with information. I've always used fresh pork in the past and never had any issues. I only used to use salt like my father & grandfather taught me and only started using cure #2 a few years ago after C.W. got after me.

Basically, as long as you use 3.33% salt anything under 3 1/2" at over 45 degrees F, the magic number is 40 days in the drying room and that should kill any Trich.
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Post by Bob K » Thu Dec 15, 2016 13:46

The 3.33% salt makes for a very salty tasting product. If in doubt freezing may be a better option.
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Post by redzed » Sun Dec 18, 2016 17:57

I agree with Bob. And if you add .25% salt to the mix you will have 3.58%. Once your sausage drops 35% in weight it will have nearly 5% salt content. Many claim that anything over 4% is inedible.

Nothing wrong with using frozen meat for making dry cured sausages. In fact your sausage might even benefit as you will be starting with less water content. Just thaw properly and don't let it sit long after it's thawed.
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