Bactoferm F1 culture

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oneills
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Bactoferm F1 culture

Post by oneills » Sat Jun 14, 2014 15:57

Has anyone had any experience with Bactoferm F1 starter culture ? I want to make a hunter style cacciatore salami in large hog casings and the recipe calls for T-SPX culture but only have F1 on hand at the moment. It is a fast fermenting culture. Would i be better off ordering some T-SPX or can i use the F1 ? Any suggestions for using F1 if it is not suitable for what i have in mind ?

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Steve
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Igor Duńczyk
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Sat Jun 14, 2014 18:40

Hi Steve,

Being a former CH´representative I certainly see a natural link between a product like cacciatore and the T-SPX culture, and personally I wouldn´t go for a fast culture for this sausage where an "italian style aroma" should really be prominent.

F-1 is nothing but a "boosted" T-SPX and you can of course use it if nothing else is at hand, but given the relatively small calibre of a hog casing (I guess it won´t exceed 40 mm?) the fermentation proces will happen so rapidly that it may deprive you of the profound aroma and deep color formation that you will get with a "unboosted" traditional culture.
And you will have to be careful to keep the sugar/dextrose addition low in order to avoid a pronounced pH drop below 5,0. A fast culture will often show a tendency of "eating up" the avaliable sugars more agressively than a traditional.

Anyway I would suggest that you contact Ross Dive on rossdive@bigpond.net.au who is now the new Australian distributor of the Italian produced SACCO LYOCARNI starter cultures and ask him for an offer for the traditional cultures SHI-59 and SBI-77.

I have tested the SHI-59 a couple of times and can attest to its qualities - also when used in natural hog casings. Acidification is mild when dextrose is kept at 3 gr. pr. kg. and the color formation is really fine. I am looking forward to run tests with the SBI-77 which is even slower and containing both Staphylococcus Xylosus and Staphylococcus Carnosus it should give way to an even broader range of aroma nuances :razz:

And as I have mentioned previously on this forum; One advantage of the SACCO starter cultures is that they all have Listeria reducing proprieties which is not the case with T-SPX and F-1.
Wishing you a Good Day!
Igor The Dane
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Post by oneills » Sun Jun 15, 2014 03:37

Thanks Igor.
Very helpful information indeed.
Any ideas for using the F1 up ?
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Post by ursula » Sun Jun 15, 2014 04:04

I'm interested in any answers too for uses for the F1, and also what would suit FRM - 7. Since I had to order some protein lined casings from Adelaide, I thought I'd get the other cultures they had besides the T - SPX and see what I could make.
Any suggestions?
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Sun Jun 15, 2014 10:13

Hi Ursula,

I think the F-1 would always be a natual choice if you make large calibre (60mm and upwards) salami and want a fast fermentation in order to minimize the risk of dry rim if you are unsure if humidity can be kept up at 90 - 98% during all of the time before pH 5,0 is reached The fast culture makes sure that the pH drop is even throughout the mass, because with a slow/traditional culture there may be a tendency for the areas closest to the casing to see a faster pH drop than the inside part.
That is also why it is so much easier to make small calibre salami in hog casings than a large calibre.

The F-RM-7 is also a fast mover. Don´t your supplier offer the "unboosted" equivalent F-RM-10 ?
Wishing you a Good Day!
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Post by ursula » Mon Jun 16, 2014 03:28

Thank you Igor.
My protein lined casings and the cultures came today.
I will experiment with them when I make salamis later this week.
I will use T-SPX on one batch and F - 1 on the other and compare results.
FRM-7, F1 and T-SPX are the only ones I can find in Australia, so some experimentation is in order.
I will also have to do without the Bactoferm 600 mold, but that's ok.
Looking forward to getting started - fermentation chamber is nearly finished.
Regards Ursula
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Post by oneills » Mon Jun 16, 2014 09:00

Hi Ursula
Did you get your cultures and casings from MBL in Adelaide ? Also, did you phone your order through or do it online ?
Thanks
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Post by ursula » Mon Jun 16, 2014 09:29

Hi Steve,
Yes I did it over the phone. I believe you have to have a business account with them to do it online (not sure though). Their number is 08 84176000.
They also have T-SPX. Their cultures are very reasonably priced, but their freight is quite expensive.
Just a tip: If you can, order it at the start of the week. That way the cultures don't sit in transit over the weekend.
Ursula
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Post by oneills » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:27

Thanks Ursula
Making sure i've got everything organised to do salami next week. Im doing a Calabrese salami, a cacciatore (hot), 2 or 3 coppa and a lomo embuchado.

How is your bresaola going ? I 've been having trouble keeping the humidity down.
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Post by ursula » Mon Jun 16, 2014 11:51

Hi Steve,
Bresaola is on its 13th day in a vac-pac in the fridge. I plan on letting it stay there until I have fermented the salamis and mettwurst I am making later this week. I'll probably have to slice it lengthwise to fit it into a casing, as the girellos are simply too big.
You sure are making a lot of salamis. What a fine feast you will have!
I am really looking forward to starting mine. I've only made a sopressata before, under conditions which I could not control.
So far I have planned 3 different types to make: a Danish (CW's recipe), two versions of Milano and a smoked Hungarian.
Cheers Ursula
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Mon Jun 16, 2014 14:25

Ursula!
Personally I would feel more comfortable if we from now on refer to CW´recipe as "Salami Danese" because in CW´s very elaborate and much preferable makeover "a la italiana" it has become quite remote from the general Danish salami concept (and in this case: for the better!).

But if you haven´t got mold that will at least make it a bit more Danish: as the microclimate over our lovely flat green isles usually prevents an even growth of common Penicillium (such as nalgiovense) all salami and spegepoelse produced locally are cold smoked. Or as we call it here "Salmon-smoked".

To give that Danish twist to the smoke you can use beechwood and add a good deal of juniper berries and some juniper branches too.

Anyway, try to write to Ross Dive: rossdive@bigpond.net.au and ask him if he has got SACCO´s FPN-63 on stock (a Penicillium nalgiovense). I have tested it and it works...
Wishing you a Good Day!
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Post by ursula » Wed Jun 18, 2014 02:10

Hi Steve,
How are you going with the humidity control?
Today I am making a couple of kilos of mettwurst (spreadable German fermented).
My fermentation chamber is set up, but on some test runs yesterday I noticed that humidity swung a fair bit, going up as the temperature goes down. The other direction was not an issue, as the humidifier will kick in and bring it up, but to bring it down will have to find another method. I've got sawdust in front of the wood heater to dry, and will try that in the chamber, swapping it out periodically. I need 75% for the mettwurst. I suspect on Friday, when I make my various salamis, that it won't be as much of an issue, as they need higher humidity.
Guess it's a matter of getting used to how the equipment works.
Best wishes Ursula
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Post by oneills » Thu Jun 19, 2014 02:33

Hi Ursula,
Still having trouble keeping humidity down at night time when outside temps dropping and humidity rises. Have increased ceramic heat lamp setting to within 1degree celcius of fridge cut in point (13 & 14 respectively)so that fridge cycles more regularly reducing humidity as well as placing a small fan inside to create some airflow. Had a lot of black mold at beginning so took them out of casings and wrapped in collagen sheets and renetted. These are much easier to use and seem to do the job better, just a quick wipe with a vinegar soaked cloth and mold is.gone. I think bad mold problem is over now as they have dried a bit and nice white mold is starting to develop.
Plan on doing my salami and various cured meats next week. Will be experimenting with different flavour combinations and heat levels and different size salamis.
Good luck with your salami making. I hope we get to see some pictures of your salumi.

Cheers
Steve
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Post by ursula » Thu Jun 19, 2014 03:01

Hi Steve,
Starting to stabilise the humidity/temps. I'm not actually using the fridge compresor at the moment, as the ambient temp is lower than I want. The single light globe seems to be enough to keep the temperature in the desired range, and the humidifier works a treat when the humidity is low. The other end of the range is harder to control, but I found putting some newspaper in the bottom of the fridge, and sawdust in the tray seems to avoid the greater swings. Still have to wait and see. Greater humidity, of course required when I do the salamis (only 75% needed for the Mettwurst), so I'll soon work things out.
Today I'm making preparations for the salami making tomorrow (mettwurst will start the smoking phase then).
I'll be interested in seeing the development of mould on the salamis: I thoroughly cleaned the fridge with dishwahing liquid, then bleach, and finally vinegar. Your black mould sounds a bit yuk.
I'll take plenty of pics.
Best wishes Ursula
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